Attorney General Chris Carr Announces Two Indicted for Stealing U.S. Treasury Checks

September 6, 2017

ATLANTA, GA –Attorney General Chris Carr today announced the indictment of two following an investigation into stolen United States Treasury checks. 

“We will hold those who attempt to steal or forge the identity of others for their own selfish gain accountable,” said Attorney General Chris Carr. “I applaud our Consumer Protection Unit, Special Prosecutions Unit and the United States Secret Service for their efforts in investigating and prosecuting these cases.”

A Fulton County Grand Jury charged Altaron Veasy with four counts of Theft by Taking, and a Clayton County Grand Jury charged Terrence Woolfalk with Identity Fraud and Possession of a Firearm by a Convicted Felon.The Fulton County indictment alleges that Veasy took the money transferred by four U.S. Treasury checks payable to other individuals between December 2013 and March 2014. The four checks totaled $34,447.59. 

A joint investigation by the Office of the Attorney General’s Consumer Protection Unit (CPU) and the United States Secret Service (USSS) led investigators to the residence Veasy shared with his cousin, Woolfalk, in Clayton County. During a search of the residence, investigators located evidence which resulted in the Clayton County indictment. It alleges that Woolfalk possessed identifying information concerning another person with the intent to fraudulently use that information and further alleges that Woolfolk was in possession of a handgun after having been convicted a felony.

Assistant Attorney General Blair McGowan from the Office of the Attorney General’s Special Prosecutions Unit (SPU) presented the Veasy case to the Fulton County Grand Jury on August 29, 2017. On August 30, 2017, McGowan presented the Woolfalk case to the Clayton County Grand Jury. The cases were investigated by Wilson Cabrera, a Criminal Investigator with the Consumer Protection Unit, and James Cox, a Special Agent with the United States Secret Service.

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Members of the public should keep in mind that indictments contain only allegations against the individuals against whom the indictment is sought. A defendant is presumed innocent until proven guilty, and it will be the government’s burden at trial to prove the defendants guilty beyond a reasonable doubt of the allegations contained in the indictments.